While doing field work, I had the opportunity to take some time aside and speak to local high school students in Menghai, Yunnan about my research and the importance of wildlife conservation.

While doing field work, I had the opportunity to take some time aside and speak to local high school students in Menghai, Yunnan about my research and the importance of wildlife conservation.

Charles Xu (徐聪)

My name is Charles Xu (徐聪) and I am a Ph.D. student at the Redpath Museum and Department of Biology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. I was born in China and have lived in the U.S., Hong Kong, the Netherlands, France, Sweden, and now Canada. I consider myself a third-culture kid and global citizen. I have a background in molecular ecology and environmental DNA and I am interested in developing new genetic tools to assist conservation efforts such as forensic methods for species identification. There is great potential for science to benefit conservation by providing data for evidence-based policies. Yet, I think there is often a large disconnect between academic research and what kinds of information is actually needed by natural resource managers, wildlife trafficking enforcement, and conservation policy-makers.

I hope that my participation in the Y4WC forum and the CITES CoP will help to address this gap by sparking new collaborations and new avenues of research that will ultimately help wildlife conservation efforts around the world.