My favourite survey in the Manu Biosphere Reserve. Nothing compares to the nice smell of fermented fish bait, removing sweat bees of my eyes, avoiding bullet ants sting, and feeling sooo sweaty. All of that while trying to go through the butterfly ID field guide to come out with the morphospecies number as quick and careful as possible to don’t hurt the little butt. Sounds challenging? It was! But so much worth it!

My favourite survey in the Manu Biosphere Reserve. Nothing compares to the nice smell of fermented fish bait, removing sweat bees of my eyes, avoiding bullet ants sting, and feeling sooo sweaty. All of that while trying to go through the butterfly ID field guide to come out with the morphospecies number as quick and careful as possible to don’t hurt the little butt. Sounds challenging? It was! But so much worth it!

Giezi Juriko Rupay Valdivieso

I am Juriko, a Peruvian conservationist, hopelessly in love with the Amazon rainforest. I seek to understand, through research, the role of invertebrates in the regeneration of tropical forests. I also aim to raise the value of the Amazon wildlife by blogging on the online platform of the International Journal of Tropical Biology and Conservation. This keeps me connected with my beloved jungle while tied to my desk and computer. But it was here I found about the opportunity to be part of the Y4WC forum and CITES CoP 18! An experience of a lifetime where I will be able to observe, first-hand, the CoP negotiations.

This meeting is especially important for my country and Latin America, as we are requesting that the jaguar, the biggest cat of this region, be recognised as a flagship species and to increase the regulations to stop illegal wildlife crime. Besides that, as the cherry on the cake, I’ll meet other young conservationists from all around the world in such a beautiful place: Sri Lanka!